Crohn Disease


Most of the time crohn disease or it can also be known as crohn's disease. This is the inflammation of the bowels, but it is more appropriate to say that it is the inflammation of the digestive tract as the inflammation could happen in any area of the digestive tract.

The digestive tract is very long as it starts from the mouth and ends in the anus. However it is  more likely that it  happens in the intestines area causing diarrhea and huge abdominal pain.


Other symptoms may vary from anal bleeding, skin problems, arthritis, weight loss, fatigue to even moderate temperature at times.


It can strike anybody at anytime , but research has it prevalent in people that are between the ages of 15 and 30. It is usually a chronic disease and will re-occur from time to time.


There is no specific studies that show why it comes about, but it has been established that it is a hereditary condition.

There are various ways for a doctor to diagnose this disease, and this may include any one or more of the following: a physical examination, a stool test, a blood test, a barium X ray, a colonoscopy or a biopsy and occasionally CT scans can also be performed.


It is very difficult to diagnose because there are so many other ailments that cause the very same symptoms, and that  includes our hemorrhoids.


The treatments used by the medical profession are only there to manage the symptoms and problems caused by crohn.


They manage to do this by using medications and nutritional supplements, and in some severe cases surgery is the preferred solution.


Over time, the three problems that stand out the most with crohns, and there are many, is blockage of the intestine, anemia caused by the continuous loss of blood, and the risk of cancer.


Crohn's disease may also be called ileitis or enteritis.



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